Tag Archives: children

What if we could save the planet? Eco-friendly pitfalls and pickups from one parent to another


Last night, I thought about how I’ve been respecting the earth lately. Truthfully, I was not impressed.

I have always had more eco-friendly ‘leanings’. Anyone who is remotely tuned in to the state of the environment is too. Here’s a debriefer, if you need to review: http://www.greenfacts.org/en/digests/state-of-the-environment.htm

Foodwise? I was a vegetarian bordering on a vegan in my university years, and a pescatarian up until the birth of my second child. And now? It’s a real mix I tell you!! No red meat for me, however.

For transportation? Rode my bike wherever I went, took the subway, carpooled my rowing crew (I sure do miss that crew!).

Clothing? Bought my clothes at Kensington Market in high school (the trendy place downtown to shop for used items). Reduced, reused, recycled when possible.

Fast forward to my child-bearing and child-rearing years and what has happened? Of course I’ve maintained my passion for eco-friendly living. But there have been really significant compromises. We’ve done the cloth diapers, the infant pottying, the hand-me down clothing, the eating local and organic. I’m currently doing my best to stick with non-toxic cleaning agents for the home and environmentally friendly moisturizers, cleansers, deodorants, and shampoos for us. The most eco-friendly of the ecoshampoos do leave some product residue, but all-in-all I’m willing to make a few sacrifices for the sake of the earth. David Suzuki Foundation’s Queen of Green has these helpful tips on green cleaning products if you’re interested in adopting a few: http://www.davidsuzuki.org/what-you-can-do/queen-of-green/

Of all this, I am pleased.

Now to the disheartening part. We’ve also done disposable wipes and diapers (for the times when we’ve run out of clean cloth diapers because we fell off the cleaning schedule), the school drop off and pick ups for the kids in a car that ‘resembles’ an SUV, the cool outings that you can only get to by burning that liquid gold to keep the kids entertained, or show them ‘nature’ not seen elsewhere. The countless dinners wasted on picky, picky eaters. More water consumption with additional laundry loads. Disposable cups, plates, utensils, at a park or big party venue with frosted cupcakes and instant pizza delivery. Over-packaged baby mum mums and granola bars. Over-processed foods for immediate consumption when the family is just plain hungry already, three kids are melting down, and there are mountains of chores still left to do before dinner.

The truth is, having kids makes being eco-friendly exponentially more challenging. Even if you are not a parent, the life we all live right now is a fast-paced and overburdened one. If I were going to be the person I need to be to really do my part, I would definitely need to do some prep work after the kids have gone to bed, in addition to what I already do to keep afloat for the next day. ‘Cause otherwise, we’ll just be heading to that terrible Golden Arches drive-through again on our mad rush to the next XYZ class. But the truth is, we are all just plain tired. Tired!! And cranky. Yesterday was especially an evening to forget. And that does not bode well for helping out our planet these days. But that doesn’t mean we can’t keep trying.

Teaching the next generation to respect their environment is no longer enough. We really have to be part of the solution so that they can inherit a world full of promise. So today, I am challenging myself (and anyone else out there who thinks they’re up for it) to take on a day (or even two or more!) where you consider what you’ve done to help out your ‘mother’. Mother Earth that is. A day to walk rather than drive. A day to eat local, organic, a little less of the foods that burden our sacred lands. A day to use less water. Less electricity. Do we really need ALL this ‘power’? A day to pause on how we can teach our children to really love this planet we’ve been given and walk the talk. Will we one day rise up to the challenge and really be the stewards that the planet needs to survive? Here’s hoping.

-m.

 

For more on how your diet affects the earth, you can find some enlightening resources here:

http://www.ceeonline.org/greenGuide/food/upload/environmenthealth.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_meat_production

 

How transportation affects the environment:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_impact_of_transport

 

Another blog about eco-friendly parenting:

http://www.ecofriendlyparenting.net/

-m.

Kids’ Summertime Fun with Inukshuks and Rock Art


Sunday afternoon turned out to be the perfect day to spend doing an indoor activity with the girls. The rain finally came down in thick sheets after weeks of a heat wave and dry spell.

With our bag full of rocks which we recently collected at our local ‘Cherry Beach’, we decided to create our very own miniature Inukshuks (also known as Inuksuk and Inuksuit (pl.) by the Nunavut and Government of Canada through Indian and Northern Affairs Canada).  To be culturally respectful, I will refer to them as Inuksuk (singular) and Inuksuit (plural) from here on in.

According to Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuksuk, an inukshuk, for those who are not already familiar is a:

‘..stone landmark or cairn built by humans… used by the Inuit…. and other people fo the Artic regions of North America for [the purposes] of navigation, as a point of reference, a marker for travel routes, fishing places, camps, hunting grounds, places of veneration, drift fences used in hunting or as a food cache… The word inuksuk means “something which acts for or performs the function of a person”. ‘

For more intorductory info on the Inuit usage of Inukshuks/Inuksuit, you can check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuksuk as well as http://www.inukshukgallery.com/inukshuk.html.

J’s kindergarten teacher introduced her class to the ‘Inukshuk’ and other rock art in the last few days of school, after they had gone to the beach for some fun in the sun and sand. Here is a piece of J’s personal rock art that she created with some of the collected rocks.

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Unfortunately, we missed the original ‘Inukshuk’ building activity as we were returning from a camping trip in Killbear (more on this later!) with the family around that time. However, we did happen to see a lot of examples of ‘Inukshuks’ along the driving route, and were eager to make our own when we returned.

Here are some examples of Inunnguat (pl.) or Inunnguag (sing.), which is essentially a rock sculpture depicting a human figure and that is commonly mistaken as an ‘Inukshuk':

Inukshuk, 95. Photo credit: www.cbantlerart.com

 

Inukshuk – Kuujjuaraapik January, Inuksuk in the vicinity of Kuujjuarapik, Canada. Photo credit: Nicolas M. Perrault

Before we started creating our own ‘Inukshuks’, I was not aware of all the potential types of rock sculptures that are often misrepresented as Inuksuit (e.g. the Inunnguat pictured above). For a more complete appreciation of Inuit rock creations that the Inuit of North America have created and used as markers for thousands of years and what the Inukshuks are, you can watch this short clip by Peter Irniq, an Inuit cultural activist, which explains the meaning of an Inukshuk in What is an Inukshuk here: : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKQ97rOwBH0&feature=related 

 

Here are some photos of the miniature Inuksuit we created:

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If you’re looking for some inspiration on how to build your own Inuksuit , I also found this clip 2010 – How to build an Inukshuk (@hofstadlyceum.nl) quite enjoyable to watch:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf25KoI6CnY&feature=related

Happy Inuksuk building!

- “You are on the right path.” (Traditional meaning of Inuksuk.)

 

 

Singing Our Way Through the Day


Hands up if you like to sing throughout the day (e.g. in the shower, in your car during your commute to or from work, school, etc.) If not, here let me get you started – Madonna’s ‘Material Girl’ has been playing on our XM radio 80’s station quite a bit lately and J, R, and I enjoy boppin’ to the beat of the tune in our car:

“Material Girl” – Madonna

Some boys kiss me, some boys hug me
I think they’re O.K.
If they don’t give me proper credit
I just walk away
They can beg and they can plead
But they can’t see the light, that’s right
‘Cause the boy with the cold hard cash
Is always Mister Right, ’cause we are
[Chorus:]
Living in a material world
And I am a material girl
You know that we are living in a material world
And I am a material girl…[continued]

Note: the lyrics leave much to be desired so feel free to pop another tune in your head!

Great!! And do you also have a song or rhyme for a special part of each day? Well, it seems one of my daughters has recently decided to make this a daily practice for our family. Not only will she insist on rhyming everyone’s names (e.g. Alex Balex, Rosie Posie, Silly Lily) but she delights in listening to all sorts of rhymes throughout the day that we manage to create (I will spare you these particular rhymes as they are probably only funny to us, potentially embarassing, and therefore best kept in the family).

I have to admit, singing and rhyming more regularly has been a pretty fun experience for us all. When J and R were just a toddler and infant respectively, I did come up with a few of my own made up rhymes or short songs just to giggle our way though transitions such as a diaper change, meal, bath, or attempt to get out the door. On days where I was less light-hearted and didn’t, things always seemed to be that much more challenging and my patience with the children would be lost that much faster. In fact, this is still the case even now!

At the end of the day, the girls will often request that I say a special verse, song and/or prayer (especially just after turning the lights out). A favourite verse is Star Light, Star Bright ever since we put up some glow in the dark stars just above their beds.

Star light, star bright, The first star I see tonight; I wish I may, I wish I might, Have the wish I wish tonight.

Comet Lovejoy

Photo credit courtesy of Jia Hao, TWAN

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/05/pictures/120515-best-earth-sky-pictures-2012-comet-milky-way-space/

For the different seasons and weather there are some great rhymes as well. We have a lovely resident robin who visits our front lawn each day and sings ever so sweetly at just a bit before 5am. This is naturally a time when most of the family should still be asleep, but I may or may not be (depending on how the pregnancy insomnia is going that night or on which kid decides to pile into our bed before sunrise).

Photo courtesy of: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Turdus-migratorius-002.jpg

So in honour of our friendly, little Robin (and courtesy of J’s wonderful teacher who reminded us of this song in her song and poetry reading book), here’s what we’ve been singing lately:

Robin in the rain,
Such a saucy fellow.
Robin in the rain,
Mind your socks of yellow.
Running in the garden on your nimble feet,
Digging for your dinner with your long strong beak.

Robin in the rain,
You don’t mind the weather
Showers always make you gay.
Bet the worms are wishing you would stay at home,
Robin on a rainy day — don’t get your feet wet,
Robin on a rainy day!

Lyrics can be found here as well: http://www.grandparents.com/gp/content/activitiesandevents/sing-alongs/article/robin-in-the-rain.html#ixzz20CANeDUz

What about songs inspired by what you do or see that day? On an expedition to the local bank machine the other day, we came across a bunch of cyclists riding bicycles built for two, which of course brought the following song Daisy Bell by Henry Dacre in 1892 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daisy_Bell) to mind:

Photo courtesy of: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Daisybell.jpg

Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do,
I’m half crazy all for the love of you.
It won’t be a stylish marriage –
I can’t afford a carriage,
But you’d look sweet upon the seat
Of a bicycle built for two.
-Henry Dacre, 1892

Singing and rhyming with your children throughout the day may not only provide you with laughter and enjoyment, but may actually improve your health and well-being according to this article by Alice Wignall:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/aug/26/healthandwellbeing.fitness

Singing can also increase your children’s language development, academic performance and emotional well being. According to an article by Amelia Hill published in the Guardian (May 08, 2011):

Singing traditional lullabies and nursery rhymes to babies and infants before they learn to speak, is “an essential precursor to later educational success and emotional wellbeing”, argues Blythe in a book. “Song is a special type of speech. Lullabies, songs and rhymes of every culture carry the ‘signature’ melodies and inflections of a mother tongue, preparing a child’s ear, voice and brain for language.” Blythe says in her book, The Genius of Natural Childhood, to be published by Hawthorn Press, that traditional songs aid a child’s ability to think in words. She also claims that listening to, and singing along with rhymes and songs uses and develops both sides of the brain. “Neuro-imaging has shown that music involves more than just centralised hotspots in the brain, occupying large swathes on both sides,” she said.

For the full article click here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/may/08/singing-children-development-language-skills?fb=native&CMP=FBCNETTXT9038

Here’s to more sing-song, and carrying on thoughout your day today!

International May Day Celebrations Renewed


Well here we are. May 1st. Some exciting things are happening this month! While typically here in Canada we think of Mother’s Day and Victoria Day celebrations as the highlights of May, it seems that there has been a resurgence in the popularity of celebrating the very first day of this bright and cheerful month all over the world: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Day

May Blossoms from the May tree. Photo Credit: ceridwen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Queen_of_the_May,_in_June_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1346819.jpg

May Day, also known as the Gaelic festival of Beltane (May 1st) and the German Walpurgis Night http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walpurgis_Night (which is celebrated on the night of April 30 – and leads into May 1st),  is  typically observed in areas such as England, Scotland, Ireland, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Sweden, France, and even Hawaii (where it is more commonly referred to as “Lei Day”).

Historically, May 1st was considered the first day of summer in some pre-Christian pagan cultures.  This day was celebrated in pre-Christian times as the festival of Flora in honour of the Roman Goddess of Flowers. Following the conversion of Europe to Christianity, many pagan celebrations were either dropped or given religious undertones. In Roman Catholic cultures, May is considered Mary’s month and May Day is usually celebrated as a tribute to the Virgin Mary. Flowers are used to adorn her head in a May Crowning represented in works of art such as plays, sculptures and figure drawings. 

For many other people, May Day is recognized as a secular tradition where spring and fertility is celebrated with events such as dancing around a Maypole decorated with colourful ribbons, and the crowning of the May Queen.  

Maypole in Munich, Germany http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Viktualienmarkt_Maibaum_Nahaufnahme_1999.jpg

Queen Guinevre’s ‘Maying’ by John Collier. Photo credit: Andreas Praefke http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_Collier_Queen_Guinevre%27s_Maying.jpg

If you are looking to make your own May Pole check out this amazing blog on spring festival celebrations and Maypole ideas at Kleas: http://kleas.typepad.com/kleas/2011/05/spring-festival.html

DIY Maypoles with dyed silk ribbons. Photo credit: http://kleas.typepad.com/kleas/2011/05/spring-festival.html

Here are a few other great sites to visit for creating a Maypole and celebrating May Day with your children:

Maypole with Beads. Photo credit: www.gardeners.com

Maypole Nature Table. Photo credit: http://3.bp.blogspot.com

Fresh flowers and Ribbon Maypole. Photo credit: http://stillraisingthenextgeneration.com

Stone-tipped Fairy Ribbon Wands. Photo credit: http://paintcutpaste.com

A sweet tradition in the past (that is likely to gain new momentum) was to prepare May Day baskets filled with flowers or treats, and to leave them anonymously on the front door steps of a neighbour or friend. For tips on how to make your own May Day basket, visit Ben Partridge’s excellent post on The May Day Basket Refresher at Apartment Therapy at http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/may-day-basket-refresher-how-t-118478

May Day Baskets. Photo credit: Ben Partridge http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/may-day-basket-refresher-how-t-118478

May 1st is also International Workers’ Day  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Workers%27_Day which was officially recognized in 1891 and celebrates the International Labour Movements and marks the 1886 Haymarket Massacre in Chicago and the subsequent 1894 May Day Riots in Cleveland, Ohio when people rioted against the ineffectual measures the city officials carried out to reduce the skyrocketing rates of unemployment at the time. While this day is officially reconized elsewhere, here in Canada and the United States, Labour Day is recognized on September 1st (a move that was favoured by the then governor of Ohio so as not to commemorate the riots).

Currently, there is a resurgence in the United States and elsewhere to celebrate this infamous day in the context of supporting the 99% of the population who are not as well off as the remaining 1%. This planned day of protest is fuelled by the Occupy Wall Street (and other Occupy movements around the world) .

So what will we be doing this May 1st? Since I’ll be at home with the girls, we will be celebrating this special day as a tribute to spring and all its glory. My litle ladies love dressing up in their most desirable princess gowns and dancing around the living room or out in the front yard. So we will likely be doing some dancing (as per usual!) Not sure if we’ll have a little May Pole set up to dance around…although we could make a makeshift May Pole using our beautiful white hobby horse which would also double as a perfect companion to my two lovely little May Queens.

And perhaps a flower garland for their hair, or pansy flowers pressed into shortbread cookies in a basket would be a welcome activity to add to our day.

For a great shortbread recipe with pressed flowers to celebrate spring, here’s a great article on Stonegable: http://stonegable.blogspot.ca/2010/05/pansy-shortbread-cookies.html

Pansy shortbread cookies. Photo credit: http://stonegable.blogspot.com

Here’s to a very Happy May Day and a great start to your month! What does the month of May mean to you? Will you do anything special this May Day? Please share your thoughts.

How I Got My Cleaning Groove Back or Really…How I Finally Discovered My Cleaning Groove


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Photo Credit: Quentin Bacon, House Beautiful Magazine

I’m glad to say that after 5+ years of motherhood, I have finally been able to bring my house to some semblance of order….no kidding folks! It really took me this long! When the kids were younger, I had many plans of how to tackle the job. The problem was, there was never enough time to get these plans accomplished. Schedules would inevitably be thrown off, I would be too tired at the beginning, middle or end of the day to do what I originally set out to do, and/or I just needed down time after work and taking care of the kids and housekeeping was the very, very last thing I would think of doing.

Sure, bathrooms and floors got cleaned (eventually!) and especially just before guests arrived…and fully prepared meals were rare but available… if I had someone dedicated to watch over the kids for a few hours!! I definitely did not have it under control on most days!

The thing I’ve realized though is that having cleanliness and order in the house really seems to help unclutter a lot of the clutter that accumulates in our heads on a daily basis. And when you’re already overwhelmed with being a parent, having a messy, unclean house is no help at all and often leaves you feeling more stuck and disgruntled. I’m sure many of you can relate!

We managed those earlier years by giving up other ‘essential’ things (more on this later!) so that we could hire a very lovely lady who helped us out once a week to do the cleaning. And if you can afford to do this when your kids are young…I highly recommend this. I realize for many, this is not an option. And I am very appreciative that we had this opportunity. And for various reasons, now we’re back to managing house and homekeeping on our own.

So what to do if you don’t have the extra help? I’ve spoken with my friends and family and searched the world wide web high and low, and have come to the conclusion that most people do something very similar to me. Melissa’s blog, The Inspired Room has some really great ideas. You can read a sample of her suggestions for keeping a tidy house in under 5 minutes, here:

http://theinspiredroom.net/2009/08/08/four-daily-routines-how-i-keep-my-house-clean-enough/

As for me, I try to keep up with this routine (which I really have only begun in the last few months) and can say that it really does help me keep my family’s sanity in check.

Here’s what I’ve learned works for our family (may be yawn-inspiring but for some quite exciting depending on what stage of life you’re at!):

Mornings:

Me time (shower, qigong/yoga)

Quick clean of bathroom

Put away any remaining clean and folded laundry

Take all laundry down and start wash (without complaining that no one ahem- e.g. the ‘hubby’ has!)

Write, read paper, space out, whatever before everyone is up

Breakfast

Unload dishwasher and drying rack

Clean Kitchen Area -I use Meyer’s Clean Day to finish the job…it makes me happy and the added expense is worth it in my opinion

Prepare lunch

Fix up bedsheets in each room (as fast as possible…duvet covers are great for this)!

Do a 5-10 minute Tidy Living Room Frenzy with kids just before heading out to Park/Daily Outdoor Time (with perhaps a bit of persistent nagging and without trying to yell louder than I need to on my more desperate days)

Take out garbage and recycling (again without complaining that no one else has done this yet before rushing off to work)

Afternoons (when one kid is in school):

Drop off daughter at school

Meet up with friend/ Break for an hour while little one rests/quiet time (hey we need our breaks!)

2 weekly grocery shops/ prep for dinner

Pick up daughter from school

Play time with kids outdoors

Finish Dinner Prep

Dinner

Evenings

Dishes/ Clean kitchen while other parent does bathtime

Storytime

Put kids to bed

Sweep and wash floors

Prep for any future meals if necessary

Fold laundry

Down time/ go to sleep!

In addition, I am now trying to simplify our life even more by reducing the number of clothes we each have to something more manageable. Of course it’s great to have a selection of clothing especially in a four season country like ours, and also to get hand me downs to add to your children’s wardrobe…but how much of it do we really, really need? And how many loads of laundry are we really realistically able to handle? Over the next few days, I will be paring things down drastically..all in an effort to control the daily onslaught of laundry, which somehow piles up miles high before I even realize it. Stay tuned!

What are some of your daily routines at home that help provide sanity in your household?

Happy Easter! How to Naturally Dye Your Easter Eggs


Thought I would share this post again in honor of the start of Spring and in celebration of Easter.

(With a little one who just turned 8 months, I’ve been relying on simple arts and crafts for the older children such as water colour and wet-on-wet painting with a fresh spring colour scheme. We are reusing our beautifully natural-dyed eggs from the previous year and enjoying the rest of our time playing outdoors in this fantastic spring weather.)

Happy Easter!

…………………………..

It’s Easter Monday and we have had a beautiful long weekend with family. This year, we decided to celebrate rebirth and spring both indoors and out. We began with a trip to our local farm, Riverdale Farm, where children and adults alike can enjoy the daily activities of the animals and their caretakers. My older daughter is enrolled in a wonderful program there called, Little Farmers, where the kids learn about each of the different types of farm animals each week. This week the focus was fittingly on chickens and eggs.

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In keeping with the chicken and egg theme for Easter, we decided to naturally dye our hollow Easter eggs.

To do this you will need:

-8-12 eggs
-skewer sticks
-4-8 toothpicks
-8-12 strands of approximately 10-12cm length twine/ thin string
-15 yellow (Spanish) onion skins
-2 tbsp white vinegar
-pot of water

Directions:

Peel the outer skins of 15 yellow onions. Place in medium saucepan with 4 cups of water and 2 tbsp of white vinegar.

(At this point if you choose to dye hard boiled eggs that are red in colour, you can insert whole eggs into water as well.)

Bring pot to a boil then simmer for 20 minutes. (For those using hard boiled eggs, remove eggs at different intervals following this to achieve variation in desired colour.) Use a sif to separate onion skins from natural onion dye.

For those wishing to use hollow dyed eggs which you can later attach to string on branches for decoration follow these additional steps:

While waiting for pot to boil, you can remove egg yolk and whites from your eggs, by puncturing top and bottom of eggs carefully with tip of sharp knife. Make sure to make holes on bottom at least a 1/4 size of your smallest thumbnail.

Use skewer stick to push through hole on top and bottom of eggs and to puncture egg membrane.

Cover top hole on egg with mouth and blow the egg white and yolk out through bottom hole into medium sized bowl.

Do this for all the eggs. Rinse and store in egg carton.

Dip hollow eggs into boiled onion dye and let dye sink in for up to 20 minutes. Remove at different intervals for achieving yellow, pink and red colour. For a stronger reddish brown dye, leave eggs in dye overnight in refrigerator.

For a more finished look, coat eggs in olive oil which gives them a nice sheen.

To display your hollowed-out natural dye eggs:

Tie a small knot on end of each string of twine and insert toothpick that has been cut to 1 cm length into knot before tying tightly once only. Thread end of string and toothpick vertically into top hole of egg shell until stick is fully inserted. Once in, the toothpick should fall into a horizontal position easily to hold string in place. You can also attach string through egg holes with clasps or tape. Tie string with attached egg onto branches such as forsythia or pussy willows in a vase for a beautiful indoor decoration. Or plant in plantar outdoors.

Enjoy!

Here’s what we did in pictures:

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Welcoming the light after the dark


The last few weeks have seen some hardships for my small but growing family. With the decision to finally transfer my older daughter into a new class, we had our share of anxiety as to what the transition would be like for her.  The ‘not knowing’ phase before the decision was made was probably the most anxiety ridden part. Removing Julia from a situation that was not improving and that was not being properly addressed was the best way to help our little one out. Once she started her new class, it was clear that a positive shift had occurred. While I’m sure any change produces its fair share of stress, especially on little ones, my little girl has shown how truly resilient we humans can be… how placing our trust in each other can truly make or break a situation.  In her new environment, I have seen her adapt to new and positive energy from her lovely teacher and classmates. Today, I caught a glimpse of her bursting with joy, running in the playground with her new and also old friends after school. She could not have made her mother happier or prouder.

This post is really meant for my friends who are going through their own experiences lately of illness, loss, fear, anguish – I can only imagine what you are going through. I know our concerns at this time are trivial compared to what some of you are now going through. I hope your days become lighter with each moment and each breath that accepts and then let’s go.  Light may shine through slowly, but it will surely find its way to you.

The Gift of Welcome


My daughter started a new class yesterday. What a strange adventure the last few weeks have been! While the challenges of kindergarten may seem trivial to some from the outside, those who have children or have experience dealing with ‘little people’ know how truly devastating an on-going, non-positive experience in a child’s first year of school can be. It can be made even worse if a child is not given the proper support right away to address such a situation. Thankfully, my husband and I finally took the bull by its horns and pushed through (with a mama bear perseverence that truly shone this time), until we saw some clear and constructive action.

While it would’ve been nice for everything to get sorted out and have my daughter carry on in the same class for the last four months of the school year, it seems that getting to this point and then having her switch into a new class was truly a blessing in disguise.

On  her first day, the new teacher handed me a note which I opened up at home. Boy, did she ever get the showers going! I was so pleasantly surprised by her kind words of welcome and also of her sense of understanding about what emotions we were experiencing, that I could not stop crying. Her words and actions have truly made such a difference. If only such actions were truly contagious…I think the world would become a much better place, much faster.  I am truly very thankful to this lovely person who has entered our lives.

May this story send you the positive vibrations that my family and I are experiencing right now.